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Aircraft Performance

james albright james@code7700.com

Certification versus the real world

On April 2, 2011, a Gulfstream 650 test crew perished while completing steps along that airplane’s road to certification under Title 14 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 25 (14 CFR 25). They had been hard at work, proving the aircraft could fly the very low takeoff safety speeds predicted by its designers.

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Aviate, Navigate, Communicate

Richard N. Aarons bcasafety@gmail.com

The first rule of airmanship: Fly the airplane

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Read more here:: Aviate, Navigate, Communicate

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Bombardier Challenger 350

Improving on the best-selling super-midsize jet

The Challenger 300 is a tough act to follow. When it made its debut in late 2003, it instantly became a modern day and more affordable successor to the Gulfstream II, with plenty of thrust, a generously sized wing and sporty performance. Similar to the GII, it had transcontinental U.S. range, a flat floor, room for eight in a double club cabin, inflight baggage access and rock-solid reliability. If it had wide oval cabin windows and a heavy-iron price tag, people might have thought it was built in Savannah, Ga., rather than Montreal.

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Read more here:: Bombardier Challenger 350

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Bombardier Challenger 350

Improving on the best-selling super-midsize jet

The Challenger 300 is a tough act to follow. When it made its debut in late 2003, it instantly became a modern day and more affordable successor to the Gulfstream II, with plenty of thrust, a generously sized wing and sporty performance. Similar to the GII, it had transcontinental U.S. range, a flat floor, room for eight in a double club cabin, inflight baggage access and rock-solid reliability. If it had wide oval cabin windows and a heavy-iron price tag, people might have thought it was built in Savannah, Ga., rather than Montreal.

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Read more here:: Bombardier Challenger 350

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Challenger 350 Performance

These graphs are designed to illustrate the performance of Challenger 350 under a variety of range, payload, speed and density altitude conditions. Do not use these data for flight planning purposes because they are gross approximations of actual aircraft performance.

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Read more here:: Challenger 350 Performance

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Cockpit Voice Recorder Transcript

Richard N. Aarons bcasafety@gmail.com

TSB investigators determined that the accident pilot was getting a briefing on the King Air’s instrumentation and avionics systems from the assisting pilot during the flight from Georgetown, Texas, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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Read more here:: Cockpit Voice Recorder Transcript

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Comparison Profile Challenger 350

Designers attempt to give exceptional capabilities in all areas, including price, but the laws of physics, thermodynamics and aerodynamics do not allow one aircraft to do all missions with equal efficiency. Tradeoffs are a reality of aircraft design.

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Read more here:: Comparison Profile Challenger 350

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Fast Five with Shawn Vick, Chairman, Global Jet Capital

Fast Five with Shawn Vick, Chairman, Global Jet Capital

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Read more here:: Fast Five with Shawn Vick, Chairman, Global Jet Capital

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Honeywell HTF 7350 Powerplants

Two FADEC-equipped, 7,323-lb. thrust AS907-2-1A engines, marketed as HTF7350 turbofans, power the aircraft. Normal takeoff thrust is available to ISA+15C. APR increases the takeoff thrust flat-rating to ISA+20C.

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Read more here:: Honeywell HTF 7350 Powerplants

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Pilot Report: Bombardier Challenger 350

Improving on the best-selling super-midsize jet

The Challenger 300 is a tough act to follow. When it made its debut in late 2003, it instantly became a modern day and more affordable successor to the Gulfstream II, with plenty of thrust, a generously sized wing and sporty performance. Similar to the GII, it had transcontinental U.S. range, a flat floor, room for eight in a double club cabin, inflight baggage access and rock-solid reliability. If it had wide oval cabin windows and a heavy-iron price tag, people might have thought it was built in Savannah, Ga., rather than Montreal.

read more

Read more here:: Pilot Report: Bombardier Challenger 350

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